Studying Japanese.

Mitsuoki Tosa “Cherry Trees”
Edo period (1615-1868), late 1650s-1660s
Pair of six-panel screens: ink, color, gold, paper
165 cm. x 355 cm
I’ve been reading up on some blogs and forums about taking up Japanese Studies, and the practicality of a graduate programme in this field. The NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences has one where you can take a Master of Arts by Research (Japanese Studies), which is by far the only programme I could find that has everything that I want in a course. 

This of course led me to wonder if this was practical at all. 
While I’ve read that the idea of taking up a course in university is to actually learn something because it is a field of interest and not a means to escape the poor job market, others have said that it’s a complete waste of time, and that it’s only practical to take more vocational courses like business, finance, accounting, or a skill that can actually be put to good use. 
After six years in public relations and financial communications, I’ve learnt that practicality is one thing; it is a waste of time to be in a line of work where, although nothing wrong in itself, you lose everything about yourself. 
As exciting as public relations has been, I’ve never felt more drained. 
Hence, as I look forward to my last day of work here (March 15 ahoy!), I am exploring options and opportunities available to see how I can cultivate this interest (or passion?) that most people I know sort of frown upon. 
The (re)search continues. Fingers crossed!
Update: So apparently NUS says I need an honours degree (which I don’t) or an equivalent (4-years Bachelor), preferably in a related discipline (so business is out of the question. Taking Japanese language classes for 4 years also don’t count), and with research experience (clearly I don’t). Intake for January 2014 ends May 2013. If anyone has any connections to the profs with whom I can ask more questions about the programme @ NUS, I’ll be happy to discuss offline! 
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